Itineraries

Itinerari

Via CAVOUR

Via CAVOUR

Walking about via CAVOUR is a bit like taking a step back in time,in a part of Terni's past, which begins with the Roman Interamna, of which the current road was a stretch of the Decumano. It then continued in the Middle Ages until reaching, approximately, the early 1600s, a time span in which the palaces of the most outstanding families in the city were built up here. Itis these historic buildings that make Via Cavour one of the most elegant places in Terni and make it a very pleasant itinerary. The route is outlined between Piazza della Repubblica and Porta Sant’Angelo(from the 14th century) which was the western entrance to the city along the Roman and medieval walls, still partially preserved today. And it is along this path that the stately palaces with their magnificent “features” follow one another, almost side by side. In reality, Via Cavour is the hub of an area scattered with fine buildings (from the 1500s to the 1700s) and crossed by characteristic alleys. Starting from the side towards Piazza della Repubblica, you will find: Palazzo Cerafogli, Palazzo Mastrozzi Magroni, Palazzo Sciamanna, Palazzo Possenti Castelli, Palazzo Mazzancolli(seat of the state archive) built in the 15th century on commission by Ludovico Mazzancolli, who was also bishop of Terni. Finally Palazzo Laurenzi. The eighteenth-century Palazzo Fabrizi overlooks via Fratini. At the corner of via Cavour and via Santa Croce, you can admire the small church of Santa Croce, dating back to the 13th century, which houses the painting "The Invention of the Cross" (17th century) by the school of Giacinto Brandi. Arriving at Porta Sant’Angelo,which takes its name from the sculpture of St. Michael the Archangel that is set on it,you can admire the particularity of the pointed arch on one side and round arch on the other. In this point there is one of the five thematic boards dedicated to as many periods in the history of the city. Installed in key places, the boards present historical-cultural itineraries, from Roman Terni to the architect Ridolfi's Terni, and are equipped with QR Code technology to download informative videos on smartphones and tablets.

 

 

 

Walking about via CAVOUR is a bit like taking a step back in time,in a part of Terni's past, which begins with the Roman Interamna, of which the current road was a stretch of the Decumano. It then continued in the Middle Ages until reaching, approximately, the early 1600s, a time span in which the palaces of the most outstanding families in the city were built up here. Itis these historic buildings that make Via Cavour one of the most elegant places in Terni and make it a very pleasant itinerary. The route is outlined between Piazza della Repubblica and Porta Sant’Angelo(from the 14th century) which was the western entrance to the city along the Roman and medieval walls, still partially preserved today. And it is along this path that the stately palaces with their magnificent “features” follow one another, almost side by side. In reality, Via Cavour is the hub of an area scattered with fine buildings (from the 1500s to the 1700s) and crossed by characteristic alleys. Starting from the side towards Piazza della Repubblica, you will find: Palazzo Cerafogli, Palazzo Mastrozzi Magroni, Palazzo Sciamanna, Palazzo Possenti Castelli, Palazzo Mazzancolli(seat of the state archive) built in the 15th century on commission by Ludovico Mazzancolli, who was also bishop of Terni. Finally Palazzo Laurenzi. The eighteenth-century Palazzo Fabrizi overlooks via Fratini. At the corner of via Cavour and via Santa Croce, you can admire the small church of Santa Croce, dating back to the 13th century, which houses the painting "The Invention of the Cross" (17th century) by the school of Giacinto Brandi. Arriving at Porta Sant’Angelo,which takes its name from the sculpture of St. Michael the Archangel that is set on it,you can admire the particularity of the pointed arch on one side and round arch on the other. In this point there is one of the five thematic boards dedicated to as many periods in the history of the city. Installed in key places, the boards present historical-cultural itineraries, from Roman Terni to the architect Ridolfi's Terni, and are equipped with QR Code technology to download informative videos on smartphones and tablets.

 

Revised Google translation

 

 


St Valentine
Marmore falls
Outdoor
Historic centre